batteries Archives - Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd

Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd Energy Management Summit | Forum Events Ltd

Posts Tagged :

batteries

Volklec eyes EVs with Midlands battery manufacturing plant

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Volklec, a new UK manufacturing business making batteries for electric vehicles, has launched based in Coventry with the vision of Powering Electrified Mobility as it manufactures sustainable batteries for on-road, off-highway and track vehicles.

In an innovative UK technology collaboration, Volklec is working with UKBIC, the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre and national manufacturing development scale-up facility, which also provides skills for the growing EV battery sector.

Volklec, working with UKBIC, will develop batteries to meet the attribute requirements of the UK automotive market, in particular the diverse array of small volume and niche vehicle manufacturers.

Volklec’s product development and rapid route to scale-up provides a critical component in the roadmap to giga-scale production. The collaboration will directly create jobs in the West Midlands and contribute directly to building world-class battery R&D, process and manufacturing capability in the UK.

Imran Khatri, Volklec Founder, said: “Volklec has been many months and significant investment in the making, established to help the UK’s decarbonisation drive.  As a proud investment in the UK, our initial focus is on the automotive industry, providing security of supply to the sector, then we intend to look at the broader electrification markets as well.”

Sean Gilgunn, UKBIC Managing Director, said: “We’re delighted to welcome Volklec to UKBIC and to become their launch base here in the heart of the UK automotive industry. Our purpose-built facility is where businesses can develop their battery manufacturing processes at the scale they need to move to industrial production. This agreement marks the start of Volklec’s journey to create a battery with the potential to scale up to significant volumes in the coming years, and we are proud to support the business in the initial phase of their development. Manufacturing cells at volume is vital to ensuring the UK prospers from the energy transition towards Net Zero, and this agreement further demonstrates the unique value of UKBIC to the battery ecosystem.”

Digital Product Passports ‘will transform’ EV battery industry by enabling supply chain traceability

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Over 5 million BEVs will be sold with a Battery Digital Passport in Western Europe in 2027, where global manufacturers will have to start creating battery Life-Cycle Assessments (LCAs) by 2025. LCAs provide the critical information needed to generate Battery Passports.

That’s according to ABI Research, which says amid a growing demand for sustainable choices, businesses and consumers face challenges in making informed decisions due to data gaps in supply chains. The Digital Product Passport (DPP), pioneered by the European Union, aims to simplify this task. Between 2026 and 2027, DPPs will be first implemented in the greatest environmental impact product group, batteries & vehicles.

“The Digital Product Passport will be a game-changer promoting traceability, material and energy efficiency, and repair-based business models,” says Rithika Thomas, Sustainable Technologies Industry Analyst at ABI Research. The Battery Digital Passport is a digital twin of the battery, which stores information about the battery with a QR code, serial number, and supporting unique verification documents to demonstrate the circular flow of resources from raw mineral extraction to material production, manufacturing, operation, and recycling.  The battery passport aims to be a global one-stop verification for battery quality and responsible manufacturing.”

Successful DDPs rely on strategic data management across ecosystem players. Manufacturers must invest in robust tools for supply chain data and disclosures to unlock the full potential of DPPs. Initiatives like the Global Battery Alliance, with partners such as Audi and Tesla, along with Circularise, Circulor, Minespider, Minviro, and Siemens, prototype Battery Passports to enhance transparency in the battery value chain, reshaping the EV battery industry for a circular and sustainable future. As technology advances, secondary ecosystems, like the recycling market and second-life batteries, will thrive, offering significant carbon emissions advantages in applications such as stationary storage for photovoltaic systems, emergency power supplies, or power buffers for fast charging.

DPPs are an emerging technology within the circular economy framework. Diversifying data collection and applications in consumer goods, construction, apparel, and food sectors through solutions like those from  Avery Dennison, Kezzler, PSQR, 3E, Madaster, and Circuland expands long-term business opportunities. Using DPP for customer engagement and showcasing sustainability commitment ahead of product-specific regulations is crucial.

Detailed product information communicates a company’s dedication to sustainability, quality, regulations, and transparency. “DPP facilitates data collection, collaboration, and informed decision-making, optimizing production and identifying cost-saving and circularity opportunities. Recognized as powerful tools for transparency, digital product passports aggregate lifecycle information on a common platform. Proactive companies gain investment, customer acquisition, regulatory influence, transparency improvement, and operational compliance benefits through sustainability reporting and data transparency,” Thomas concludes.

These findings are from ABI Research’s Digital Product Passports: Tech-Driven Sustainability and Traceability for EV Batteries, Construction Materials and Pilot Use Cases.

EU mulls stricter battery legislation

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

The European Commission is proposing to modernise its legislation on batteries – delivering the first initiative among the actions announced in its new Circular Economy Action Plan.

The EU says batteries that are more sustainable throughout their life cycle are key for the goals of the European Green Deal and contribute to the zero pollution ambition set in it. They promote competitive sustainability and are necessary for green transport, clean energy and to achieve climate neutrality by 2050.

As such, the proposal seeks to address the social, economic and environmental issues related to all types of batteries.

It says batteries placed on the EU market should become sustainable, high-performing and safe all along their entire life cycle. This means batteries that are produced with the lowest possible environmental impact, using materials obtained in full respect of human rights as well as social and ecological standards. Batteries have to be long-lasting and safe, and at the end of their life, they should be repurposed, remanufactured or recycled, feeding valuable materials back into the economy.

The Commission proposes mandatory requirements for all batteries (i.e. industrial, automotive, electric vehicle and portable) placed on the EU market. Requirements such as use of responsibly sourced materials with restricted use of hazardous substances, minimum content of recycled materials, carbon footprint, performance and durability and labelling, as well as meeting collection and recycling targets, are essential for the development of more sustainable and competitive battery industry across Europe and around the world.

Providing legal certainty will additionally help unlock large-scale investments and boost the production capacity for innovative and sustainable batteries in Europe and beyond to respond to the fast-growing market.

The measures that the Commission proposes will facilitate achieving climate neutrality by 2050. Better and more performant batteries will make a key contribution to the electrification of road transport, which will significantly reduce its emissions, increase the uptake of electric vehicles and facilitate a higher share of renewable sources in the EU energy mix.

With the proposal, the Commission also aims to boost the circular economy of the battery value chains and promote more efficient use of resources with the aim of minimising the environmental impact of batteries. From 1 July 2024, only rechargeable industrial and electric vehicles batteries for which a carbon footprint declaration has been established, can be placed on the market.

To close the loop and maintain valuable materials used in batteries for as long as possible in the European economy, the Commission proposes to establish new requirements and targets on the content of recycled materials and collection, treatment and recycling of batteries at the end-of-life part. This would make sure that industrial, automotive or electric vehicle batteries are not lost to the economy after their useful service life.

To significantly improve the collection and recycling of portable batteries, the current figure of 45% collection rate should rise to 65 % in 2025 and 70% in 2030 so that the materials of batteries we use at home are not lost for the economy. Other batteries – industrial, automotive or electric vehicle ones – have to be collected in full. All collected batteries have to be recycled and high levels of recovery have to be achieved, in particular of valuable materials such as cobalt, lithium, nickel and lead.

The proposed regulation defines a framework that will facilitate the repurposing of batteries from electric vehicles so that they can have a second life, for example as stationary energy storage systems, or integration into electricity grids as energy resources.

The use of new IT technologies, notably the Battery Passport and interlinked data space will be key for safe data sharing, increasing transparency of the battery market and the traceability of large batteries throughout their life cycle. It will enable manufacturers to develop innovative products and services as part of the twin green and digital transition.

With its new battery sustainability standards, the Commission will also promote globally the green transition and establish a blueprint for further initiatives under its sustainable product policy.

Solvay and Veolia partner on electric vehicle batteries

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Solvay and Veolia have announced a partnership on a circular economy consortium to offer new solutions that promise better resource efficiency for critical metals used in lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries.

With the number of electric vehicles on the road expected to grow from 8 million in 2020 to 116 million by 2030, the partners state that ensuring stable access to raw materials is a strategic challenge. Furthermore, they claim materials used today in EV batteries are not always recovered at their maximum value. 

Solvay and Veolia, through its subsidiary SARP Industries, say they are already actively engaged in discussions with a car manufacturer and battery cell producers, to coordinate, collaborate and leverage on respective technologies and core competences at each step of the value chain – from access and spent battery feedstock to dismantling, metal extraction and purification. 

Solvay’s role in this consortium is to optimize the extraction and purification of critical metals such as cobalt, nickel and lithium and transform them into high-purity raw materials for new batteries, ready for another fresh start. Solvay is also present in the EV and hybrid battery value chain thanks to its high-performance specialty polymers for binders and separators and specialty additives for electrolytes. 

“I am truly excited about our partnership with Veolia, aiming to take circularity another meaningful step forward towards cleaner mobility,” explained Solvay CEO Ilham Kadri. “At Solvay, our technologies will bring new life to batteries at the end of their cycle. Our unique know-how combining Specialty Polymers, Composites and Mining solutions together with Veolia’s unique experience in waste management, is a fantastic opportunity to build a greener battery ecosystem.” 

In its recycling plant in eastern France, Veolia has already been dismantling batteries for electric vehicles since 2013. The combination of mechanical and hydrometallurgical processes makes it possible to treat the active cells and extract the active metals. These metals are then used by industry and transformed into new materials. Press Release 2 

“The recycling of electric vehicle batteries and the management of the pollutants they contain are major ecological and industrial challenges. By partnering, Veolia and Solvay help develop the recycling value chain and the production of strategic raw materials for the production of new batteries. If today the essential compounds of batteries are mainly imported, tomorrow they will be regenerated in Europe”, said Antoine Frérot Chairman and CEO of Veolia. 

Establishing this partnership is integral to Solvay Group’s sustainability ambitions and its Solvay One Planet commitments. By 2030, Solvay will generate 15% of its revenues from either bio-based or recycled-based materials.

Interactive map pinpoints global lead battery energy storage installations

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

A digital map detailing more than 120 lead battery-powered energy storage projects has been unveiled by the Consortium for Battery Innovation (CBI).

The map, published online for the Energy Storage Association’s annual conference held in Phoenix, Arizona, includes diverse case studies demonstrating successful lead battery energy storage installations from the United States, Asia and Europe.

The feature is included on the Consortium for Battery Innovation’s website

Through a range of case studies, the map details how lead battery storage is supporting utility and renewable energy systems. This includes providing back-up for local power grids and supplying off-grid electricity to power remote communities. 

CBI Director Dr Alistair Davidson said: “We are seeing growing interest in lead battery energy storage for utility and renewables systems all over the world. The aim of this initiative is to highlight some of these installations and encourage companies to share other examples we can highlight demonstrating the variety of projects currently in place.” 

“Our analysis suggests demand for battery energy storage will increase significantly in the next five years. This new tool will allow us to demonstrate that the latest lead battery technology is supporting a wide range of installations with reliable, safe, sustainable and cost-effective energy storage. 

“A focus of CBI is to conduct pre-competitive research to support development of the next generation of lead batteries which will significantly extend both battery life and performance, to support diverse energy systems and electrification.” 

Battery thermal management needs highlighted by EV research

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Frost & Sullivan research has revealed battery capacity has increased by more than 50kWh across all plug-in hybrid/battery electric vehicles (PHEVs/BEVs), while 150+kW batteries now come with fast-charging capabilities.

These advances in battery technologies are creating a parallel need for a battery thermal management system (BTMS) to ensure higher mile range, longer life, and superior battery performance.

While passive thermal management, such as air-cooled systems, will be the key technology for HEVs, liquid cooling and active thermal management will be popular among PHEVs and BEVs.

“The use of liquid glycol through cooling tubes and plates between modules will not only help original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) maintain battery efficiency but also allow their vehicles to achieve compliance with stringent battery standards,” said Arvind Noel Xavier Leo, Industry Analyst, Mobility. 

“In the future, OEMs will adopt active thermal management systems that centralise all thermal needs for battery, motor, power electronics, and cabin temperature.”

Frost & Sullivan’s recent analysis, ‘Global Analysis of Electric Battery Market and Battery Thermal Management System for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, Forecast to 2025,’ provides in-depth analyses of BTMS and highlights the current and future products of manufacturers. The study covers the markets of Europe (Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), China, South Korea, Japan, and North America (the United States).

“Prismatic cells are the most preferred cell structure due to their high energy density and compact packaging, and present significant opportunities for high-end passive BTMS due to their thermal instability,” noted Leo. “Most OEMs are outsourcing battery cells for EVs and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and assembling the module and pack in-house. LG Chem, Panasonic, Samsung SDI, and Sanyo will be the key cell suppliers for western OEMs, whereas BYD, CATL, and CALB will be the key battery manufacturers in China and will look to adopt western OEM technology.”

More information on the analysis can be found here: https://go.frost.com/EI_PR_KCekani_MDD0_ElectricVehicle_Mar19